Sausalito is not known as a particularly polluted area. Still, there is an industrial side of Sausalito that stretches from Dunphy Park along the waterfront to the houseboats at Waldo Point on Gate 5 Road.

Along this stretch there are boatyards, film processing centers, ceramics factories, and automotive shops, just to name a few. Many of these companies are registered with the Environmental Protection Agency because they release pollutants of one type or another. The EPA’s website offers specific details about each company–what kind of pollutants they release, where the site is located, and also the demographics of people living near by. It’s a very cool Web site, enter your zip code to check out where you live.

The result of this bit of industry is that there are some cancer-causing air pollutants in Sausalito. While the odds of actually getting cancer from these are slim–less than 27 in 1 million, to be precise–the chance is still there. Below is a graph that shows what pollutants may have cause that pesky cancer if you happen to be one of those poor 27 per 1 million people. At least it should help you figure out who to sue.

While there are no dangerous superfund sites in Sausalito, there is one site in the Marin Headlands listed by the EPA of having toxic releases. The site is listed as belonging to Service Engineering Company, and while the address given was Pier 38 in San Francisco, the EPA’s map showed the actual location as being in the Headlands.

Below is a graph showing the demographics of the residents who live within a mile of the site. Too often, minorities and poor people are the ones who have to live near toxin-releasing sights. But this being Marin County, the the vast majority of the thausand-or-so residents have college degrees and are fluent English speakers. At least it’s bucking the trend.

All in all, Sausalito, and Marin County in general, are quite pristine when it comes to air quality. But nonetheless, people should know about what poses a potential risk in their neighborhood, so make sure to check out the EPA’s site, it’s their job to tell you, after all. May as well get something for your high property taxes.